What do you hope to achieve through your participation in the Stanford Innovation and Entrepreneurship Certificate

What do you hope to achieve through your participation in the Stanford Innovation and Entrepreneurship Certificate

Another major handicap that is cited regularly in literature on the Aboriginals of Canada is poor health. In various ways, the group is incapable of articulating its concerns in a manner that would contribute to its inclusion at the center of national concerns; when compared to other cultural groups in Canada, the Aboriginals lack the level of advantages that are necessary for attracting mainstream support from the Canadian government (Hele, 2013). Without the background of sufficient resources, the community is incapable of accessing quality and affordable healthcare as often as necessary. Besides, the group cannot compete fairly for the limited healthcare resources that are necessary for the improvement of the overall healthcare (Prochner, 2010). Despite the major resources that the Canadian government has directed towards the improvement of healthcare, the Aboriginals still lag behind in terms of access to such healthcare.

Low levels of employment have often hindered the progress of Aboriginals because it multiplies their inability to make meaningful economic advancement. Compared to the other groups in Canada Aboriginals are the most impoverished (Hedican, 2013). Previous studies that have focused on the mismatch between the needs of the Aboriginals and the challenges of integration have often cited the peculiar aspects of the Aboriginal culture as a major setback that undermines their opportunities for progress (Hedican, 2013). There have been assumptions that the socio-economic challenges that face the Aboriginals are usually derived from their cultures. However, different studies have shown that the economic situation of this group is derived from the effects of Intergenerational Trauma.

It is widely held that traumatic experiences which the group has been exposed to may have long term impacts on the physical and psychological health of the affected individuals. Adverse intergenerational consequences that have been endured by the Aboriginals are considered as the major hindrances that undermine their effort to fit into the Canadian mainstream society (Okafo, 2016). Apart from the direct impact of the various socio-economic afflictions that undermine the health of Aboriginals, it is evident that a majority of them live with the enduring effect of Intergenerational Trauma. Studies on the prevalence and distribution of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress in Canada have shown that the Aboriginals are more vulnerable than other groups in their country (Okafo, 2016; Hedican, 2013). In this regard, the lives of the Aboriginals are highly dependent on the manner in which they perceive other Canadians and how the others regard them. The representation of trauma in the society affects numerous cultural and historical factors that undergird the multiple problems.