Roman Arts in Realism

Introduction

In this discussion, you will collaborate with your peers to analyze the similarities and differences between the works of Roman art. Deadlines All work is due by Wednesday, May 8, at 11:59 PM

Instructions 1. Original post (4-5 sentences, 10 points): Take a look at your instructor’s posts below. Each shows two images.

1. Choose one of these pairs to reply to by clicking the reply arrow directly beneath them.

2. Write one paragraph (no more, please) in which you complete all the following: Describe a formal similarity between the two works

Describe a formal difference between the two works

2. Peer response (3-4 sentences, 10 points): After you post your original discussion post, you will be able to see your peers’ posts and respond to them.

Compose a response to a peer post in which you

Explain how each work of art your peer responded to represented a political or cultural value held by the Ancient Romans.

What was the meaning of each of these works in their time?

Important: Responses should be substantial (about 3-4 sentences) and show a close reading and consideration of your peer’s post.

Grading

To view the grading rubric for this discussion, click on the “more options” icon (3 vertical dots at the top) and then select “show rubric”. Please note, if viewing the course via the Canvas mobile app the rubric does not appear on this page. Unrea 5/1/2019 Topic: 6.7 Discussion: Roman Art in Comparison – Module 6 group 2 https://ccsf.instructure.com/groups/11654/discussion_topics/182509 2/5  Reply (https:// Nicole Oest (hps://ccsf.instructure.com/groups/11654/users/120607) Monday  Comparison 1 Augustus of Primaporta, 1st century C.E. (Vatican Museums). Speakers: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker. Created by Beth Harris and Steven Zucker. Veristic male portrait (center) from the early 1st Century B.C.E. (Vatican Museums). 5/1/2019 Topic: 6.7 Discussion: Roman Art in Comparison – Module 6 group 2 https://ccsf.instructure.com/groups/11654/discussion_topics/182509 3/5 Edited by Nicole Oest (https://ccsf.instructure.com/groups/11654/users/120607) on Apr 29 at 4:59pm  Reply  (https://secure.flickr.com/photos/82032880@N00/24179505431) (https:// Nicole Oest (hps://ccsf.instructure.com/groups/11654/users/120607) Monday  Comparison 2 Temple of Portunus (formerly known as, Fortuna Virilis), c. 120-80 B.C.E., structure is travertine and tufa, stuccoed to look like Greek marble, Rome. 5/1/2019 Topic: 6.7 Discussion: Roman Art in Comparison – Module 6 group 2 https://ccsf.instructure.com/groups/11654/discussion_topics/182509 4/5  Reply  (https://secure.flickr.com/photos/25453448@N02/9690118767) Model of the Sanctuary of Fortuna Primigenia, (original built in the late second century BCE) from the archaeological museum, Palestrina. (CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Reconstructions_and_Plans_of_the_Sanctuary_of_Fort una_Primigenia_in_Palestrina?uselang=it#mediaviewer/File:PalestrinaMuseoPlasticoSantuario.jpg) ) Model of the Sanctuary of Fortuna Primigenia (https:// Nicole Oest (hps://ccsf.instructure.com/groups/11654/users/120607) Monday  Comparison 3 5/1/2019 Topic: 6.7 Discussion: Roman Art in Comparison – Module 6 group 2 https://ccsf.instructure.com/groups/11654/discussion_topics/182509 5/5  Reply  Example of Second Style painting, cubiculum (bedroom), Villa of P. Fannius Synistor at Boscoreale, 50–40 B.C.E., fresco. 265.4 x 334 x 583.9 cm Wallk painting showing a window with broken bars Example of Fourth Style painting, Ixion Room, House of the Vetii, Pompeii, 1st century C.E. Wall painting that makes the wall look like it is decorated with windows, paintings, and sculptures

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