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Introduction to Business Law/“The Magistrates’ Court yesterday convicted John Doe for selling cigarettes to minors contrary to a statutory instrument issued by the relevant Government Minister. This follows a European Union directive which prohibits the sale of cigarettes to persons under the age of 18 years.

Introduction to Business Law/“The Magistrates’ Court yesterday convicted John Doe for selling cigarettes to minors contrary to a statutory instrument issued by the relevant Government Minister. This follows a European Union directive which prohibits the sale of cigarettes to persons under the age of 18 years.
“The Magistrates’ Court yesterday convicted John Doe for selling cigarettes to minors contrary to a statutory instrument issued by the relevant Government Minister. This follows a European Union directive which prohibits the sale of cigarettes to persons under the age of 18 years.
You are required to explain with reasons (and supporting cases where applicable):

(a) whether this was a civil or criminal case;

(b) the composition and jurisdiction of the Magistrates’ Court;

(c) the relevance of the decision for future cases of a similar nature;

(d) the meaning and effect of a directive;

(e) the meaning and effect of European Union Laws and Human Rights laws on the English courts.

2. Presentation instructions

(a) The guideline word limit is 1,500 with a maximum of 2,000. Footnotes will not count towards word count totals but must only be used for referencing – not the provision of additional text. Bibliographies will not count towards word totals. Unless specifically required in the assessment instructions appendices are not permitted, other than those required under 5(h) below.
(b) A word count total must be provided on each course work submitted. An inaccurate word count may be dealt with as cheating (an attempt to obtain an unfair advantage). See the cheating and plagiarism guidelines in the Course Guide for further details.
(c) If the word limit is exceeded any work beyond the word limit will not be marked and will thus not be awarded credit.
(d) Course work must be submitted in word-processed form, double-spaced, and correctly paginated.
(e) Standard referencing guidelines must be followed – these can be found in the Course Guide.

3. Assessment criteria

This assessment seeks to assess the following module outcomes:

(a) This assessment seeks to assess the following areas of knowledge and understanding:

(i) The composition and jurisdiction of the Courts of Law.
(ii) The meaning and effect of EU and Human Rights laws on the English courts.
(iii) The doctrine of precedent
(b) This assessment seeks to assess the following intellectual skills:

(i) Ability to assimilate simple legal materials from a range of legal sources
(ii) Ability to produce persuasive and cogently argued analyses of a range of issues relating to the general principles of business contracts

(c) This assessment seeks to assess the following transferable skills:

(i) Ability to prepare a sustained and lucid argument based on relevant legal research;
(ii) Ability to discriminate between relevant and irrelevant information and argument;
(d) This assessment seeks to assess the following communication skills:

(i) Ability to produce a word-processed document with appropriate referencing and pagination;
(ii) Ability to communicate effectively and persuasively in written English

(e) Credit will be awarded for this assessment based on the following criteria:

(i) Evidence of understanding of the working of the English Legal System;
(ii) Clarity and structure of argument; reasoned conclusion;
(iii) Use of source materials;
(iv) Presentation
4. Guidance

(a) In attempting this assessment candidates may want to have particular regard to the following issues:

(i) The effect of EU and Human Rights laws on English domestic laws.
(ii) The application of the doctrine of precedent

(b) In attempting this assessment candidates may want to have particular regard to the following useful sources:

Business Law : De Freitas – Chapters 1 and 2
NB: These references are starting points – they are not exhaustive. You should make full use of other materials to be found by conducting independent hard copy literature searches and on-line searches.

(i) In attempting this assessment candidates should be aware of these common errors and should try to avoid them:

• Simply setting out examples drawn from the existing law;
• Lengthy repetition of the facts of cases;
• Lengthy references to cases without any explanation as to how this develops the argument;

5. Submission instructions

(a) Candidates must indicate clearly on the front of the coursework their seminar group and seminar tutor (part-time students – class lecturer).

(b) Candidates must retain a copy of the assessment submitted – both hard copy and on disk. Further copies of assessed work may be required by the Course Director or Exam Board.

(e) The submitted assessment must be the candidate’s own work. All quotations must be credited and properly referenced. Paraphrasing is still regarded as plagiarism if a candidate fails to acknowledge the source for the ideas being expressed. Candidates are referred to the cheating and plagiarism guidelines in the Course Guide.
6. Feedback

Examples of work submitted may be copied (with student identifiers removed) and distributed to all candidates in order to provide examples of good practice. Please state clearly on your assessment if you are not willing for it to be copied and distributed for this purpose.

You are required to explain with reasons (and supporting cases where applicable):

(a) whether this was a civil or criminal case;

(b) the composition and jurisdiction of the Magistrates’ Court;

(c) the relevance of the decision for future cases of a similar nature;

(d) the meaning and effect of a directive;

(e) the meaning and effect of European Union Laws and Human Rights laws on the English courts.

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