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criteria outlined by Pyrczak (12 criteria for titles and 7 criteria for abstracts),

criteria outlined by Pyrczak (12 criteria for titles and 7 criteria for abstracts),

Using the criteria outlined by Pyrczak (12 criteria for titles and 7 criteria for abstracts), evaluate the titles and abstracts of the 14 articles in the attached file.

Answer the following questions:

1) What is the best title among these 14 articles? Explain why.

2) What is the worst title among these 14 articles? Explain why.

3) What is the best abstract among these 14 articles? Explain why.

4) What is the worst abstract among these 14 articles? Explain why.

5) In the UNH databases, find an article (on any CJ topic) that you think has a badly written title according to Pyrczak’s criteria. Copy and paste the article title here and explain why it is not good.
When answering the above questions, make sure to explain your answers clearly, using Pyrczak’s criteria.
Article

1
JUSTICE QUARTERLY VOLUME 27 NUMBER 6 (DECEMBER 2010)
ISSN 0741-8825 print/1745-9109 online/10/060803-32
© 2010 Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences
DOI: 10.1080/07418820903379628
On the Malleability of
Self-Control: Theoretical and
Policy Implications Regarding a
General Theory of Crime
Alex R. Piquero, Wesley G. Jennings and David P.
Farrington
Taylor and Francis
RJQY_A_438140.sgm
10.1080/07418820903379628
Justice Quarterly
0741-8825 (print)/1745-9109 (online)
Original Article
2009
Taylor & Francis
00
0
0000002009
Dr DavidFarrington
dpf1@cam.ac.uk
Gottfredson and Hirschi’s general theory of crime has generated significant
controversy and research, such that there now exists a large knowledge base
regarding the importance of self-control in regulating antisocial behavior over
the life-course. Reviews of this literature indicate that self-control is an impor-
tant correlate of antisocial activity. Some research has evaluated programmatic
efforts designed to examine the extent to which self-control is malleable, but
little empirical research on this issue has been carried out within criminology,
largely because the theorists have not paid much attention to policy proscrip-
tions. This study evaluates the extant research on the effectiveness of programs
designed to improve self-control up to age 10 among children and adolescents,
and assesses the effects of these programs on self-control and delinquency/
crime. Meta-analytic results indicate that (1) self-control programs improve a
child/adolescent’s self-control, (2) these interventions also reduce delinquency,
and (3) the positive effects generally hold across a number of different modera-
tor variables and groupings as well as by outcome source (parent-, teacher-,
direct observer-, self-, and clinical report). Theoretical and policy implications
are also discussed.
Keywords
self-control; prevention; intervention; general theory; malleability
Alex R. Piquero is a professor in the College of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Florida State
University and the co-editor of the
Journal of Quantitative Criminology
. His research interests
include criminal careers, criminological theory, and quantitative research methods. Wesley G.
Jennings is an assistant professor in the Department of Justice Administration at the University of
Louisville. He received his PhD from the University of Florida in 2007. His major research interests
include longitudinal data analysis, semi-parametric group-based modeling, meta-analytic methods,
and race/ethnicity. David P. Farrington is a professor of psychological criminology at Cambridge
University. His main research is on the development of offending from childhood to adulthood, and
he is director of the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development, which is a longitudinal study of
411 London males from age 8 to age 48. Correspondence to: David P. Farrington, Institute of Crimi-
nology, University of Cambridge, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge, UK. E-mail: dpf1@cam.ac.uk
Downloaded By: [State University of New York at Albany] At: 18:34 1 November 2010
Article

2
73
Risk Factors for Child and
Adolescent Maltreatment
A Longitudinal Investigation
of a Cohort of Inner-City Youth
Joshua P. Mersky
University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee
Lawrence M. Berger
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Arthur J. Reynolds
University of Minnesota–Twin Cities
Andrea N. Gromoske
University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee
This study investigates associations between individual, family, and extrafamilial factors and the likelihood of
subsequent childhood and adolescent maltreatment. The authors analyzed 1,411 participants in the Chicago Longitudinal
Study whose maltreatment records were verified from administrative data. Findings suggest that maternal age at the
child’s birth was a robust predictor of maltreatment outcomes. Receipt of public assistance and single-parent family
status were significant
ly associated with select outcomes. Among school-age indicators examined, parent participation in
school was negatively associated with most maltreatment outcomes. Participation in the Chicago Child-Parent Center
program was negatively associated with maltreatment, although effects varied by type and timing of maltreatment. In
separate analyses, several factors were associated with neglect, but only maternal age at the child’s birth was associated with
physical abuse. Findings suggest that prevention programs may need to target select populations and specific mechanisms
associated with different types of maltreatment to maximize effectiveness.
Keywords:
etiology; ecological models; neglect; physical abuse; longitudinal research; prevention
P
revailing ecological and transactional theories posit
that child abuse and neglect emerge through complex
processes influenced by numerous factors across multi-
ple contexts (Belsky, 1993; Cicchetti & Lynch, 1993;
Cicchetti & Toth, 1995). Guided by these conceptual
models, the field has increasingly moved toward replac-
ing narrowly focused prediction models with multifac-
torial configurations. Analyses that advance our
understanding of maltreatment and its etiology are likely
to simultaneously examine an array of child, family, and
extrafamilial antecedents to maltreatment. However,
studies using the kinds of comprehensive frameworks
needed to differentiate the effects of interrelated factors
are still in the minority.
This study is grounded in an ecological–transactional
approach, which conceptualizes child maltreatment as
being associated with multiple factors, including parent
and child characteristics as well as elements of the
broader environment in which children and families
reside and function (Belsky, 1993; Cicchetti & Lynch,
1993; Cicchetti & Toth, 1995). This perspective main-
tains that no single factor or set of factors can be
expected to “cause” child maltreatment (Belsky, 1993).
Rather, any or all of these factors may independently or
interdependently contribute to the probability that a child
is abused or neglected. As such, we do not attempt to
provide a causal explanation for abuse or neglect.
Instead, we describe the likelihood that children were
Child Maltreatment
Vo l u m e 1 4 N u m b e r 1
February 2009 73-88
© 2009 Sage Publications
10.1177/1077559508318399
http://cm.sagepub.com
hosted at
http://online.sagepub.com
Author’s Note:
Please address correspondence to Joshua Patrick
Mersky, Department of Social Work, University of Wisconsin,
Enderis Hall 1177, Milwaukee, WI 53201; mersky@uwm.edu.
at UNIV OF NEW HAVEN LIBRARY on June 4, 2012
cmx.sagepub.com
Downloaded from
Article

3
Families in Poverty:
Those Who Maltreat Their Infants
and Toddlers and Those Who Do Not
Maria Scannapieco, PhD
Kelli Connell Carrick, PhD
ABSTRACT.
Children in poverty are at increased risk of maltreatment
(Sedlak, 1997), but not all children living in poverty are maltreated. Iden-
tifying the differences between families who maltreat and those who do
not is imperative to helping families in need. This paper presents findings
from a research study looking at correlates of maltreatment and how they
are related to poverty for our most vulnerable of children, infants and tod-
dlers. It is reported that significant differences exist between families who
live in poverty that maltreat their children and those who do not. Important
practice and policy implications are discussed.
[Article copies available for
afeefromTheHaworthDocumentDeliveryService:1-800-HAWORTH.E-mailad-
dress:
<docdelivery@haworthpress.com> Website: <http://www. HaworthPress.
com> © 2003 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.]
KEYWORDS.
Family, poverty, child maltreatment, infant, toddler
Two social phenomenons that impact families and children with dev-
astating multifaceted consequences are poverty and child maltreatment.
The most developmentally vulnerable of all our children are those six
years of age and younger. Unfortunately, this is the group of children
Maria Scannapieco is Professor and Director, Center for Child Welfare, School of
Social Work, University of Texas at Arlington, Box 19129, Arlington, TX 76019
(E-mail: mscannapieco@uta.edu). Kelli Connell Carrick is Assistant Professor, School
of Social Work, University of Texas, El Paso.
Journal of Family Social Work, Vol. 7(3) 2003
http://www.haworthpress.com/web/JFSW
©
2003 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.
Digital Object Identifier: 10.1300/J039v07n03_04
49
Article

4
10.1177/0886260505278718
JOURNAL OF INTERPERSON
AL VIOLENCE / November 2005
MacDonald et al. / Y OUTH VIOLENCE
The Relationship Between Life
Satisfaction, Risk-Taking Behaviors,
and Youth Violence
JOHN M. M
AC
DONALD
RAND Corporation
ALEX R. PIQUERO
University of Florida
ROBERT F. VALOIS
University of South Carolina
KEITH J. ZULLIG
Miami University of Ohio
This study builds on existing criminological theories and examines the ro
le of life sat-
isfaction and self-control in explaining youth violence. Using data from a stratified
cluster sample of 5,414 public high school students who responded to the South
Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey, the study examines the relationship between
adolescents’ perceptions of life satisfaction, behavioral risky acts, and self-reported
acts of violence. Analyses indicate that higher levels of life satisfaction are associ-
ated with lower violence. Participation in work and involvement in health-related
risk-taking behaviors pertaining to sex, drugs, and alcohol are also associated with
increased violence. The implications of these findings for criminological theory and
for school-based violence prevention programs are discussed.
Keywords:
youth violence; life satisfaction; risk taking
Youth violence
has become an issue of growing concern within the fields of
public health and criminology (Blum et al., 2000). The prominence of this
issue has been highlighted by the fact that adolescent homicide and victim

ization rates in the United States have remained high compared to rates in
other industrialized nations (Snyder & Sickmund, 1999). With regard to
homicide and robbery, data indicate significant increases for juvenile offend

ers starting in the late 1980s and a subsequent decline beginning in the mid-
1495
Authors’ Note: The opinions reflected in this article are those of the authors and do not repre

sent the official positions of the RAND Corporation or its clients.
JOURNAL OF INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE, Vol. 20 No. 11, November 2005 1495-1518
DOI: 10.1177/0886260505278718
© 2005 Sage Publications
by guest on June 3, 2012
jiv.sagepub.com
Downloaded from
10.1177/0886260505278718
JOURNAL OF INTERPERSON
AL VIOLENCE / November 2005
MacDonald et al. / Y OUTH VIOLENCE
The Relationship Between Life
Satisfaction, Risk-Taking Behaviors,
and Youth Violence
JOHN M. M
AC
DONALD
RAND Corporation
ALEX R. PIQUERO
University of Florida
ROBERT F. VALOIS
University of South Carolina
KEITH J. ZULLIG
Miami University of Ohio
This study builds on existing criminological theories and examines the ro
le of life sat-
isfaction and self-control in explaining youth violence. Using data from a stratified
cluster sample of 5,414 public high school students who responded to the South
Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey, the study examines the relationship between
adolescents’ perceptions of life satisfaction, behavioral risky acts, and self-reported
acts of violence. Analyses indicate that higher levels of life satisfaction are associ-
ated with lower violence. Participation in work and involvement in health-related
risk-taking behaviors pertaining to sex, drugs, and alcohol are also associated with
increased violence. The implications of these findings for criminological theory and
for school-based violence prevention programs are discussed.
Keywords:
youth violence; life satisfaction; risk taking
Youth violence
has become an issue of growing concern within the fields of
public health and criminology (Blum et al., 2000). The prominence of this
issue has been highlighted by the fact that adolescent homicide and victim

ization rates in the United States have remained high compared to rates in
other industrialized nations (Snyder & Sickmund, 1999). With regard to
homicide and robbery, data indicate significant increases for juvenile offend

ers starting in the late 1980s and a subsequent decline beginning in the mid-
1495
Authors’ Note: The opinions reflected in this article are those of the authors and do not repre

sent the official positions of the RAND Corporation or its clients.
JOURNAL OF INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE, Vol. 20 No. 11, November 2005 1495-1518
DOI: 10.1177/0886260505278718
© 2005 Sage Publications
by guest on June 3, 2012
jiv.sagepub.com

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