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Analyze how gender, sex, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and/or religion codify human bodies

English 101
Assignment #3
Using at least the four rhetorical strategies for paragraph development discussed in this unit, draw upon at least three readings to analyze how gender, sex, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and/or religion codify human bodies (1000-1250 words).
Assignment Objective
 Build an argument from careful analysis of three works.
 Create a debatable thesis statement
 Incorporate and cite evidence from three sources from Weeks 3-5.
 Synthesize or generate new insight by putting pieces of writing into conversation with each other
Rhetorical Strategies
Definition/Cause and Effect/Process/Classification and Division Analysis (see Bullock, Brody, and Weinberg 17-29; 49-53) should
Assignment Readings
Arendt, Hannah, “Deportations from Western Europe” (NR 13th 430-434)
Gay, Roxanne. “A Tale of Three Coming Out Stories” (NR 14th 77-82; on Moodle)
Katz, Jon, “How Boys Become Men” from 096 Norton Sampler (NR 13th ed 316-321; online)
Kincaid’s, Jamaica. “Girl.” (online)
Kristof, Nicholas D, “Saudis in Bikinis” (13th 176-77; online)
Quindlen, Anna, “ Between the Sexes, a Great Divide” ( NR 13th 125-27; NR 14th 72-74)
Staples, Brent, “Black Men and Public Space” (NR 13th 188-90; NR 14th 141-43)
Sullivan, Andrew, “What is a Homosexual” (NR 13th 127-31)

Your Definition/Cause and Effect/Process/Classification and Division Analysis (see Bullock, Brody, and Weinberg 17-29; 49-53) should %
• have a strong opening and closing. (B,B,W 2-5; 6-8; 9-10; 28-29); and
contain a clear and compelling thesis (B,B,W 4; 6; 10-11; 52-53; 62-65) 20
• be organized into well-developed paragraphs with clear topic sentences,
effective transitions (B,B, W 11-12;17-29; 21-22; 53; 62-65); and
show evidence of critical analysis using at least four rhetorical strategies to support topic sentences and claims
(B,B, W 6-8; 13; 49-53; 62-65; 30
• be grammatically competent with very few if any subject-verb agreement, verb
form, and verb tense errors. (B,B,W 13-16; S 4 260-72; 272-76 15
• contain very few if any sentence errors: comma splices, run-on/fused
sentences, fragments, awkward constructions. (B,B,W 13-16; S-1 356-365) 15
• show correct use of a variety of punctuation marks. (B,B,W 13-16; P-1-11)
• contain very few mechanical, spelling, and stylistic errors.
(B,B,W 13-16; P-1-11) 05
• use MLA format for heading, page numbering, and essay title. (B,B,W 149-55)
• integrate quotations, cite in-text (R-3 95-6; R-4 97-104)
• document sources i.e. include a Works Cited page, formatted correctly
according to MLA format. (122-24; 156-57) 15

Essay Review Checklist
Always title your essays using an original and creative title.
Remain cognizant of your audience and purpose. Do not preach, lecture, moralize. “If you would only learn to love instead of hate, the world would be a better place.”
Use Present Tense when referring to the source text(s), and Keep Tense Consistent.
Integrate a summary that includes the title of the source or primary text(s) and the author’s (authors’) full name(s), i.e. first and last names on first mention. Subsequently, use author’s last name only. If at least two of your sources have the same last name, you must mention those authors’ first and last names throughout your text to avoid confusion.
Do not include opinion, evaluation, assessment, and too much detail in a summer. Give only the main idea of the reading.
Establish clear context to ground your essay: who, when, where, what, why, how
Do not make absolute, universal, and sweeping remarks. Eliminate using everyone, everybody, all, the world, everything, every time, none. Everyone suffers with some kind of disability.
Do not use clichés: “It is better to be safe than sorry.”
Try to avoid rhetorical questions, especially to open your essay. It is a very sophomoric device and has little place in college-level writing. Some students write an entire opening paragraph comprising a series of rhetorical questions. An effective thesis is more productive, and does the work of rhetorical questions. Although you may use rhetorical questions in your prewriting, eliminate by your final draft.
Do not say “I honestly….” The ethos of your text comes from the credibility of your writing and the credibility of the support you provide for our position of a subject.
Keep Voice/Perspective Consistent: First Person (singular, capital I); Second Person (you); Third Person (one; they). At all costs, try to avoid writing in Second Person: “If you don’t trust people.” Or “You should not discriminate.”
Avoid unnecessary shifts in Voice/Perspective: “Being independent is the ability to control our own lives. Independence also has to do with your ability to work things out, your aspirations and goals. An independent person has the ability to do his homework by himself without needing the help of others. I feel that I have the sufficient autonomy to do whatever I want and not rely on anything or anyone else.” (example taken from a student’s text in 2015
It is your essay, so please do not say, “I believe; I think; I feel; In my opinion; It is my view; I guess.” Just stay your position. In my opinion, I believe Unschooling is a more beneficial method of education than traditional curricula because it allows for more creativity, students do not get bored being forced to study subjects in which they are not interested, and students are more knowledgeable in a subject because they are not forced to study it in a limited time period.
Integrate quotes smoothly, using effective signal phrases to introduce your direct quotations and paraphrases.
Contextualize your quotes. You may need to insert authorial comments to clarify the context if the body text is insufficient. For example, “I tell it I hate it and despise it” ( Walker 41). The reader does not know to what the pronoun it refers. Using brackets, clarify “I tell [the blop in my eye] I hate it and despise it.” Or you may choose to be more general by saying, “I tell [my blind eye] I hate it….” (Walker 41).
Then continue to explain the significance of every quote you incorporate.. What does the author mean, and why is this particular quote or paraphrase or summary significant to your argument? Avoid just summarizing and retelling the text. Analyze.
Quote accurately. “I left the girl there, do you still carrying her?” The original text states, “I left the girl there, are you still carrying her?”
Pay attention to parallelism. For example,
“My best abilities are responsibility, independence, and reason.” (Use all nouns)
“My best qualities are being responsible, being independent and being reasonable/ using
reason.” (Use all adjectives)
My hopes are to be responsible, to be independent and to be reasonable.” (Use all verbs)
Be vigilant of your tone and diction.
Never use exclamation marks in analytical writing, only in personal narratives.
Pay attention to use of apostrophes.
Avoid ambiguous pronouns. If two or more subjects are the same, you may need to use nouns instead of pronouns to clarify an antecedent (the noun to which the pronoun refers).
Ex. John was to meet Ronald at the football stadium for three o’ clock in the afternoon, but he was late; so he left without him.
While the general rule is that the pronoun relates to the noun to which it is closer/closet, to avoid confusion, write the name of the person.
John was to meet Ronald at the football stadium for three o’ clock in the afternoon, but Ronald was late; so John left without him.
Avoid leaving the relative pronouns this, that, those, these standing alone. Always try to use a noun as well. Ex. This indicates should be This example/ issue/ meaning indicates
Write: The reason is or The reason is that….Do not write The reason is because or This is the reason why.
The reason Marion left the party so early was that she was tired after a grueling day at work.
Wrong The reason Miriam does so well on Math exams is because she reviews her
notes every day.
Correct The reason Jason does so well on psychology exams is because that he reviews his notes every day.
Wrong The reason why Ronald always participates in class discussions is because he
does all his readings before the class meetings.
Correct The reason why Miriam always participates in class is because that she does all
her readings before the class meetings.
Revise only after your complete your first draft.
Edit carefully.
Proofread carefully. You may make hand-written changes on your final document if you notice errors before submission and are unable to reprint before the deadline.
Include word count.

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